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During the early 1950s, Spots Before Your Eyes, a series of eight animated cartoons produced by AJC, aired on TV stations throughout the nation. In 1954, AJC won Variety’s annual award for the best use of television in the field of human relations.
[chronological order]

Baseball, Produced and distributed by AJC. (1950s)
Length: 1 min. 03 sec.
Theme: America is like a baseball team; all must work together to be a winning team.
Special Interest: A shortened version was broadcast during the 1952 World Series.
Here's Looking at You, Produced by AJC and the National Conference of Christians and Jews. (1950s)
Length: 1 min.
Theme: What would happen if everyone looked alike? The cartoon explains the value of diversity.
The Six R's, Produced and distributed by AJC. (1950s)
Length: 1 min. 07 sec.
Theme: Children need to learn the three new "R's" : Rights, Responsibilities, and Human Relations.
Special Interest: Sponsors included the American Legion, National Congress of Parents and Teachers, National Education Association, and the United States Office of Education.
Snickelgrass, Produced by AJC and the Advertising Council. (1950s)
Length: 59 sec.
Theme: Immigrants make important contributions to American life.
Sweet 'n' Sour, Produced and distributed by AJC. (1950s)
Length: 1 min. 06 sec.
Theme: Uses the Benny Goodman Quartet, recording of “Running Wild” to show that Americans of all races and creeds can “swing together.”
There's a U in UN , Produced by AJC and the American Association for the United Nations. (1950s)
Length: 59 sec.
Theme: Stresses importance of the UN in advancing peace and security.
Hopeful Herbert, Produced by AJC and the American Association for the United Nations. (1950s)
Theme: Stresses importance of the UN in advancing peace and security.
Three-Ring Circus, Produced and distributed by AJC. (1950s)
Length: 1 min. 07 sec.
Theme: Refusing to accept certain partners because of race or religion, “Joe the Schmo” falls off the trapeze.